A life Well-Lived

Oct 17, 2022

As I write this, I am returning from the funeral services for my father-in-law, Robert.

Bob lived to the age of 96 and enjoyed mostly good health for all of his life.

I first met Bob when I was dating his daughter (my wife, Diane) in 1984. While he did not know me, I was treated then and always with cordiality and respect. While Bob was a man not inclined to say much, whenever I spoke with him he would freely share his thoughts, which were grounded in common sense. As a child of the Great Depression and later a World War II veteran, Bob was a member of what has been referred to as the Greatest Generation.

I always knew that Bob was very sensible with his money. What I came to learn in the last few days is that Bob never took out a loan, and, therefore, was able to save considerably, even though he earned only a modest income while working for Corning, Inc.

Bob’s story reminds me that there is much to learn from our elders—constructive attitudes about money, treating others with respect, and emphasizing thoughtfulness.

Bob’s story reminds me that there is much to learn from our elders—constructive attitudes about money, treating others with respect, and emphasizing thoughtfulness.

Bob enjoyed life fully for over 40 years after retirement, including the last four years that he spent in the loving and devoted care of my brother- and sister-in-law. There is so much to admire about this simple man.

How does this relate to my work in mediation? I understand that clients who are divorcing face immense challenges and may not be thinking about what their lives mean to others. I can only hope, as you transition into your next chapter, that you will remember the elders in your life who inspire you and that you will live a future that can likewise inspire others.